Adjutant general named vice-chair of National Guard association

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  • Wisconsin National Guard Public Affairs Office
Maj. Gen. Don Dunbar, adjutant general of Wisconsin, was named the new vice chairman-Air for the board of directors of the nation's oldest military service organization.

Dunbar was selected to serve as an officer of the 29-member panel by National Guard Association of the United States (NGAUS) delegates at the organization's recent 134th General Conference and Exhibition in Reno, Nev.

"It is an honor to serve in this capacity for the NGAUS membership," Dunbar said. "The Air National Guard adds tremendous value to our nation's defense, especially in this fiscally constrained environment, and I look forward to working with the National Guard Bureau and the U.S. Air Force at this critical juncture."

Officers for the NGAUS board of directors include a chairman, vice-chairmen for Army and Air, an immediate past chairman, president, treasurer and secretary. If the chairman is absent or the position is vacant, the vice-chairman of the same component as the chairman will succeed. The newly elected NGAUS chairman, Maj. Gen. Stephen Danner, is a member of the Missouri Army National Guard and the adjutant general of Missouri.

The NGAUS board functions as the association's governing body. It has responsibility for such areas as the annual budget and large contractions. Members serve overlapping two- or three-year terms.

Responsibility for day-to-day activities of the NGAUS staff in Washington, D.C., falls on the association president, currently retired Maj. Gen. Gus L. Hargett Jr., who works for the board.

The association includes nearly 45,000 current or former Guard officers. It was created in 1878 to provide unified National Guard representation in Washington. In their first productive meeting after Reconstruction, militia officers from the North and South formed the association with the goal of obtaining better equipment and training by petitioning Congress for more resources. Today, 134 years later, NGAUS has the same mission.

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